A Case of the Creation Destroying the Creator? The West’s Many Frankenstein Monsters

March 26, 2017 at 8:32 pm (tWP) (, , , , )

Roosevelt and Churchill met in Newfoundland on board the HMS Prince of Wales in 1941 to draft the Atlantic Charter and inaugurate a century of transatlantic cooperation structures

The Cold War was unprecedented in its geographical scope and technological risk. Never before in the history of Mankind had the average citizen been forced to contemplate annihilation on a daily basis. To ensure victory, both blocs introduced new means of warfare. The West chose to employ propaganda against the East, even though by then the Western liberal democracies held higher standards for their own societies. Indeed, RFE/RL was exclusively meant for external consumption and not meant for Americans. A military establishment was built to deter Moscow from further advance into Europe and an economic establishment soon followed to ensure widespread prosperity in Western Europe and vaccinate it against communist influence. Along with NATO and the EEC, a Marshall Plan guaranteed the reconstruction of Europe and the social-democratic model kept social peace. Finally, a network of NGOs and QuaNGOs such as the Soros foundations or the National Endowment for Democracy, were in charge of civil society subversion along with the Catholic Church, to undermine Soviet control of the occupied states and client-regimes.

All these arrangements were set up in the context of a zero sum struggle for planetary hegemony, within a fiercely charged ideological atmosphere. They were by their very nature ad hoc and purely instrumental. Previous wars had depended on loose alliances and minimal civil society involvement.

Similarly, the leaders of the First World War decided to use instruments that would later cause the exponential devastation of WWII such as WMDs, total war, mass mobilisation; and to bring the latter about, ideological propaganda. Indeed, unlike the previous conflicts of the XIX century, WWI was not fought by professional armies, it featured weapons that would later be forbidden and it relied on highly indoctrinated conscripts. Total industrial warfare would then take on prohibitive proportions up to 1945.

The USSR did the same and unlike the West, Moscow was then interested in subverting half the planet on behalf of an ideology (Stalin, Brezhnev doctrines notwithstanding). The roles have however, reversed. Modern Russia is conservative and particularist and it is Brussels and Washington D.C. that seek to evangelise the world with Western values. What changed?

It is certainly the fault of the May 68 generation coming to power and fanatically pushing a progressive agenda but there is a structural component to the entire affair: bureaucratic inertia. Nature hates a vacuum and given that lazy short-term thinking Western politicians were too preoccupied to dismantle the Cold War structures, those same structures took matters into their own hands and kept fighting a war which was supposed to be over.

The capitalist bloc’s soft power arm remained engaged in fomenting colour revolutions and subverting unaligned regimes in the West’s periphery. The bloc’s hard power arm took care to find new enemies gratuitously and expand the list of allies – superfluously. Finally, the founded economic structures moved to exacerbate their competencies by expanding its reach into the political realm and the social-democratic model continued its push towards further governmental subsidisation, eventually putting Western Europe on the brink of bankruptcy.

Ukrainian revolutionary soldiers during the Donbass War

Even in the realm of intelligence, technocratic reactionaries are now attempting to influence domestic politics. Reagan’s big push towards high-tech expenditure meant to bait the USSR into ruin, is now coming back to exert its power on reforming politicians. After the #womensmarch and Antifa violence against conservatives in the US, there are those of us who fear an attempted colour revolution in Washington itself. Will domestic political subversion stop at war-mongering and witch hunts? If an impeachment is attempted with demonstrations outside the White House, months on end, the USSS may be pushed into a corner. This bears eery resemblance to the Yanukovych affair in Ukraine.

In Europe too, celebrating the 60 years of the Rome Treaties, EU leaders who seem mostly subservient to Brussels eurocrats, were egged on by the Pope to fight “populism”. Populism is never defined but seems to encompass any political force that puts the national interest ahead of supranationalism. This then necessarily means that, following the Haider and Wilders precedent, not all political forces are equal. Democracy is only desirable provided the citizenry deliver the ‘right’ votes. If not, then a supranational overseer is put in place (à la Monti) or referenda are organised in succession until the ‘right’ result is achieved. International institutions only serve the agenda of specific – mainstream – parties. Were a communist or paleoconservative party to come to power, the foreign policy of the state and that of supranational institutions, could not possibly be changed.

Imagine Napoleon’s legions dictating to Napoleon; the Comintern lecturing the Politburo on ideology; the crusaders taking power in the Holy See.

Ukrainian revolutionary paramilitary during the Donbass War

What seems certain is that the current climate of radicalisation and mainstream media instigation to violence, is going to continue.

Trump and Brexiteering Tories signified a change in paradigm but they are being undermined by a bloated governmental bureaucracy which leans on intellectual elites for civil society manipulation. If the algorithm turns on the user, at what point will the struggle remain peaceful given the eroding avenues for consented change? Western regimes have expiration dates too but if the end requires a reboot rather than a refresh, cooler heads will not prevail.

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The Ethnic Origins, Source of Power and Current Political Methods of Globalism

July 26, 2016 at 12:19 pm (tWP) (, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , )

The first image in this article is that of the English royal family’s coaagincourtt of arms. It is not chosen by accident but it is a powerfully symbolic image for the topic in question. The coat of arms is emblazoned with two repeated heraldic icons: the three fleur-de-lys and the three lions. The former were the arms of French royalty for a millennium, the latter are to this day the arms of the Danish royal family. Why is this relevant? Because it is an especially apt way of defining Britain: a mix of continental Europe and Nordic Europe. It is specifically in Nordic Britain that lies the original sin whose offspring globalism – universalism academically – is today.

Nordics are a very distinct group among the world’s ethnicities. Their geographical circumstance forces them to be highly productive since they have to generate enough resources to survive the winter. Simultaneously, they cannot rely on family ties or resources because the territory, while harvestable, is scarcely populated. This has bred a mentality which is individualistic to an extreme and radically self-reliant and disciplined. Other regions of the planet are too densely populated and too easily farmed for self-reliance to take hold. In the case of aboriginal peoples, their mentality was usually Asian and therefore collectivistic. This meant some level of discipline but not self-reliance and therefore not productivity. Discipline can be a competitive advantage in fertile regions but not in difficult ones since creativity is especially needed when overcoming challenges.

The reason why the Reformation reached almost exclusively Germanic Europe is easily explained by the mentality already in existence there: the self-reliant kind. One who is self-reliant requires a personal relationship with God and eschews collectivistic rituals. Such rituals may be well suited for preserving community ties but not so for allowing a personal interpretation of the good book. In the case of the Reformation phenomenon too, Britain is a rare breed, as its Anglicanism is a clear compromise between protestant principles and catholic ritual.

England in particular is worthy of note because it was there that many Nordics settled during the Middle Ages. We call Britain Anglo-Saxon because of these raids and invasions and what better place demonstrates this History than the tellingly named East Anglia? East Anglia is a very special place for English History: it was one of the main sources of puritanism in Britain and it was also one of the earliest regions to support the Parliamentarian (republican) revolution under the authoritarian Oliver Cromwell.

It is worth understanding that one of the key features of the Nordic mentality is that of political correctness. This is probably due to the higher need for an efficient decision-making process within Nordic settlements. Human resources are scarce and weather is unforgiving which translates into a laconic and simplistic conferential system. The great poets of the world, after all, come from the South: Middle Eastern poetry, Latin novels, etc. And lest we forget, time became a commodity in northern formal cultures, not in southern ones, which means that there was concern in optimising its usefulness in the North, not the South.

Political correctness must be understood in its puerile simplicity before moving to the next link in the chain: New England. As it happens, New England was settled mostly by …you guessed it: East Anglians; and puritan ones at that. Is it then really surprising that the two most important radical anti-hypocrisy revolutionary movements in American History – namely republican separatism and abolitionism – began in New England?

The cause of independence found its earliest and most passionate support in puritan settlements, the ‘tea party’ took place on Boston, Massachusetts. Northern (New England) colonies contributed about as many soldiers for the Revolutionary War as the Southern ones but while the northern fought the English, the southern fought with the English. The contradiction of ‘taxation without representation’ could simply not be tolerated by the puritans’ protestant ethics. Nor could, for that matter, the contradiction between the ‘self-evident truth’ that ‘all men are created equal’ and slavery. The founding fathers, of course, could perfectly tolerate it but then again, most of them were southerners like George Washington, Thomas Jefferson or James Madison.

The puritan zeal eventually spread into the Midwest and it is again revealing that it was a Midwesterner that led the abolitionist revolution: Abraham Lincoln. Indeed, most actual Nordic-Americans (those who immigrated directly from Scandinavia to America) still inhabit the Midwest and this fact became very salient during the recent Republican primaries when Donald Trump lost Wisconsin to Ted Cruz. Nordics have precious little tolerance for the antics of eccentric political incorrectness; Trump’s Berlusconism is a competitive disadvantage with Nordics and Puritans. During the civil war, whereas French-Americans and Catholics in general supported the South’s secession, English-Americans and protestants in general, supported the North.

Yet both the Midwest and New England have seen their demographics change: Boston has become progressively catholic – which explains Trump’s appeal in Massachusetts, New Hampshire and New Jersey – and the industrialisation of the ‘rust belt’ brought with it labourers from the South – whereas enriched original settlers slowly moved to the vicinities for better living conditions – which allows us to understand Trump’s success there.

9815a31c194e4a99dcc7488a12d6c153This same zeal was in evidence in the baby-boomers political conscience during the protests of the May of 68. The soixante-huitards were extremist in their beliefs, calling for absolute pacifism and social justice with the world’s poor. As soon as they reached power towards the end of the Cold War and at the onset of the ‘new world order’, theirs became the generation of endless indebtedness, overwhelming generosity towards to 3rd world and moralisation of every conflict via the ‘end of History’ paradigm. The EU itself being the ultimate soixante-huitard project of replicating in Europe the utopian extreme idea-state of American exceptionalism – a notion whose germen had been established by the founding fathers in rhetoric and by Lincoln in practice. After the end of the Cold War, America’s East-Anglian exceptionalism has now become for the Atlanticist elites, the foundation for their messianic vision of the “end of History”: a liberal-democratic, and, ultimately, a Nordic individualist, world.

It is this ethnic record that explains why Western universalists periodically do not find it difficult to support neonazi or jihadi movements. At the heart of the matter is the cause of universalism. A normal state would only consider supporting extremist movements if vital existential interests were at stake. In WWII the Allies brought in the USSR because they alone could not beat Nazi Germany, for instance. Yet, Western universalists show much smaller compunction in doing so today because they know a victory of extremist forces would advance the universalist cause. Better to have a jihadi regime in Syria or a neonazi one in Ukraine so long as they subscribe, even if only nominally, to universalist doctrine. In practice of course, a moderate but anti-universalist regime in Syria may be brutal to its citizens but it does not genocide them, and a moderate regime in Ukraine may be incredibly corrupt but it doesn’t launch the army against its citizens nor does it pass discriminatory laws which cause respect for minorities and political opponents to drop.

The world is divided between universalists and those submissive to them, and the ones who resist universalism. The Manichean division tolerates absence of universalist practices only in so far as those who don’t practice are submissive to those who preach it. Thus Saudi Arabia Egypt or Hungary can exist at the margin of universalist practice because they contribute to the cause worldwide and they can even hypocritically call for democracy, human rights and rule of law elsewhere, so long as that fits the interests of the globalist elites.

The problem is not hypocrisy, the problem does not lie in cooperating with ideologically dissimilar regimes, the problem rather consists in the fact that, at the end of the day, what is being advanced is not the interests of the different Western states, what is being advanced is only an ideological cause. Being ruled by activists means the powers of the state are subverted into serving a particular ideology.

Part of the reason why the universalists’ power is slowly eroding is their zealotry, to be sure. However, another factor is the immense contradictions that serving a failed ideology cause since the more it fails, the more excuses one requires to justify it and at some point too many excuses become counter-productive as justification.

AKP Turkey is an excellent example of this very phenomenon. According to most (recep_tayyip_erdogan_by_setobuje-d2rs6grWestern) standards, by now Turkey should be one of the most reviled regimes in the world: it is an authoritarian state where its leader is manipulating parliament to unilaterally alter the constitution in order to reinforce his own powers and remain in office, political adversaries are regularly lustrated, journalists are periodically incarcerated and media outlets brought under governmental/ruling party control, the will exists to restrict the internet, the leader’s family is corrupt and syphons money using its family connection to the leader, the country is restricting individual liberties and reinforcing religious norms, its foreign policy is disastrous since it has deteriorated its relations with most neighbours, geopolitically the government either tolerates or actively supports extremist movements abroad and it is aligned with another illiberal state to accomplish it (Qatar).

Turkey is even better as an example than Saudi Arabia because the Kingdom only seeks to survive and to what extent it changed internally, it did so to become more liberal, not less. Also important is foreign policy orientation since Riyadh has geopolitical reasons to wish to force into power an anti-Iranian regime in Syria and in Yemen. Turkey, on the other hand, has nothing to fear from Iran both because it is equivalent in size and because it can count on NATO.

Apart from totalitarian DPRK, Russia is perhaps the most detested regime in the world as far as the West is concerned but in terms of values, Putin pales in comparison to Erdogan in every respect except one: resistance to universalism. Putin may actually be more democratic, less tolerant of extremism, more accepting of opposing media, his nepotistic corrupt ties less obvious/sizeable, be more respectful of the constitutional order, less restrictive of personal freedoms, his foreign policy more successful, rational, predictable and purveyor of stability. Unlike Erdogan though, Putin is not a team player. Quite to the contrary, the Kremlin actively resists universalist influence and that is a much greater threat to an ideology than herded black sheep.

Why is that so? Because this particular ideology is revisionist to the core. It matters little that individualist universalism is not implemented in actuality. Thanks to a culturally Marxist academia and largely sympathetic media and intellectuals, what is preached today will slowly be practiced tomorrow so long as there is enough critical mass for it. The populace has a short memory and its very language and thoughts can be manipulated by the elites.

The West is often histrionic, and rightly so, when other countries revise their history books so as to gloss over past crimes. The West is not quite so outraged when the same is done in its own turf to promote its own ideology.

So at a time of record ignorance on the part of Westerners, of the role played by Russia in defeating Nazi Germany – according to polls, most Westerners believe Western troops were the ones that made the biggest effort to defeat the III Reich – Western leaders decide they will boycott V Day celebrations in Moscow because of the Kremlin’s intervention in Ukraine… so much for statesmanship and concern for historical accuracy. Similarly, there is outrage and mockery when Russian soldiers are filmed in Ukraine while Russia issues denials, and there is scandal at the breach of international law that the ‘little green men’ represent but when Western troops are found operating in secret in other countries such as Libya or Pakistan, there is no problem, no cartoons, no talk of ‘little green men’. European values are often touted as the unifying factor of the EU’s ‘unity in diversity’ project but when eastern Europeans vote against gay rights or western Europeans vote in xenophobic parties, when the death penalty is praised in one place or corruption keeps a leader in power in another, the narrative of the common values does not go away… the end of the UK’s membership of the EU was supposed to be the harbinger of multiple catastrophes from economic collapse to the erupting of wars across the continent – at least according to BBC’s ‘documentaries’ on the matter – and yet things simply went on as usual. Last but not least, one of the myths propagated by Western historical revisionists is that the EU brought with it peace to the continent: this is an outright lie which ignores that other parts of the world have been at peace without the EU or more simply that without a common security and defence policy until the 90s it was the sheer will of the states that kept Europe at peace, or that indeed, it still does today.

Then again, most citizens don’t study History so if the new truth is not canon now, it will be for the next generation.

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